Posts for: May, 2017

By Gibberman Dental
May 28, 2017
Category: Oral Health
DrTravisStorkDontIgnoreBleedingGums

Are bleeding gums something you should be concerned about? Dear Doctor magazine recently posed that question to Dr. Travis Stork, an emergency room physician and host of the syndicated TV show The Doctors. He answered with two questions of his own: “If you started bleeding from your eyeball, would you seek medical attention?” Needless to say, most everyone would. “So,” he asked, “why is it that when we bleed all the time when we floss that we think it’s no big deal?” As it turns out, that’s an excellent question — and one that’s often misunderstood.

First of all, let’s clarify what we mean by “bleeding all the time.” As many as 90 percent of people occasionally experience bleeding gums when they clean their teeth — particularly if they don’t do it often, or are just starting a flossing routine. But if your gums bleed regularly when you brush or floss, it almost certainly means there’s a problem. Many think bleeding gums is a sign they are brushing too hard; this is possible, but unlikely. It’s much more probable that irritated and bleeding gums are a sign of periodontal (gum) disease.

How common is this malady? According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control, nearly half of all  Americans over age 30 have mild, moderate or severe gum disease — and that number increases to 70.1 percent for those over 65! Periodontal disease can occur when a bacteria-rich biofilm in the mouth (also called plaque) is allowed to build up on tooth and gum surfaces. Plaque causes the gums to become inflamed, as the immune system responds to the bacteria. Eventually, this can cause gum tissue to pull away from the teeth, forming bacteria-filled “pockets” under the gum surface. If left untreated, it can lead to more serious infection, and even tooth loss.

What should you do if your gums bleed regularly when brushing or flossing? The first step is to come in for a thorough examination. In combination with a regular oral exam (and possibly x-rays or other diagnostic tests), a simple (and painless) instrument called a periodontal probe can be used to determine how far any periodontal disease may have progressed. Armed with this information, we can determine the most effective way to fight the battle against gum disease.

Above all, don’t wait too long to come in for an exam! As Dr. Stork notes, bleeding gums are “a sign that things aren’t quite right.”  If you would like more information about bleeding gums, please contact us or schedule an appointment. You can read more in the Dear Doctor magazine article “Bleeding Gums.” You can read the entire interview with Dr. Travis Stork in Dear Doctor magazine.


IfatAllPossiblePrimaryTeethareWorthSaving

Primary (baby) teeth might not last long, but their impact can last a lifetime. Their first set of teeth not only allows young children to eat solid foods, but also guide permanent teeth to form and erupt in the proper position.

Unfortunately, primary teeth aren't immune to tooth decay. If the decay is extensive, the tooth may not last as long as it should. Its absence will increase the chances the permanent teeth won't come in correctly, which could create a poor bite (malocclusion) that's costly to correct.

If a primary tooth is already missing, we can try to prevent a malocclusion by installing a “space appliance.” This keeps nearby teeth from drifting into the empty space intended for the permanent tooth. The best approach, though, is to try to save a primary tooth from premature loss.

We can often do this in much the same way as we would with a permanent tooth — by removing decayed material and filling the prepared space. We can also perform preventive applications like topical fluoride or sealants that strengthen or protect the tooth.

It becomes more complicated, though, if the pulp, the interior of the tooth, becomes decayed. The preferred treatment for this in a permanent adult tooth is a root canal treatment. But with a primary tooth we must also consider the permanent tooth forming below it in the jaw and its proximity to the primary tooth. We need to adapt our treatment for the least likely damage to the permanent tooth.

For example, it may be best to remove as much decayed structure as possible without entering the pulp and then apply an antibacterial agent to the area, a procedure known as an indirect pulp treatment. We might also remove only parts of the pulp, if we determine the rest of the pulp tissue appears healthy. We would then dress the wound and seal the tooth from further infection.

Whatever procedure we use will depend on the extent of decay. As we said before, our number one concern is the permanent tooth beneath the primary. By focusing on the health of both we can help make sure the permanent one comes in the right way.

If you would like more information on caring for children's primary teeth, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Root Canal Treatment for Children's Teeth.”


By GIBBERMAN DENTAL
May 10, 2017
Category: Dental Procedure
Tags: Cosmetic Dentistry   Veneers  

Your smile says a lot about you and how you feel. The quality of your smile can make a difference in your social and professional life. A veneerssurvey by the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry found that 92 percent of people think a beautiful smile is a crucial social asset. When you get veneers at Gibberman Dental in Alexandria, VA you can finally smile again, confidently, knowing that others will see whiter, straighter and more perfectly shaped teeth.

How Are Veneers Placed?
Veneers are only about as thin as a contact lens, but they are still very effective at hiding major tooth imperfections. First, a small amount of tooth enamel is removed from the front of your tooth to make room for the veneer. Impressions are made of your teeth and in a follow-up appointment, the veneers are cemented in place with a dental-grade bonding agent. After a bit of shaping and polishing, your veneer looks just like a new tooth—white, smooth and nicely contoured.

How Long Will Your New Smile Last?
The more you care for your smile, the longer it will last. Veneers can last up to 20 years or longer if you follow your Alexandria dentist’s care guidelines and visit regularly for professional cleanings. Since the veneer is dependent on the health of the tooth behind it, it’s important that you make every effort to keep your tooth free from infection, decay or gum disease.

Other Veneer Benefits
Veneers are usually made of a very resilient material called porcelain. This material is difficult to damage and resists staining, so it will continue to look white when you smile and feel smooth when you run your tongue over the surface.

Smile Again
Now that you’re more familiar with veneers, it’s time to consult a cosmetic dentist about them. Call Dr. Paul Gibberman, Dr. Lauren Gibberman and Dr. Maria Hodas at Gibberman Dental at 703-823-6616 today to set a date and time for a dental evaluation.